Bookmarks

    Collection of reference materials or articles I've collected


    Two Kinds of Code Review

    One goal of a review process is good code. Another goal of a review is good coders. The review is a perfect mentorship opportunity, it is a way to increase contributor’s TRM.


    Inadvertent Algorithmic Cruelty

    I didn’t go looking for grief this afternoon, but it found me anyway, and I have designers and programmers to thank for it.


    The Problem with Threads

    Threads are a seemingly straightforward adaptation of the dominant sequential model of computation to concurrent systems. Languages require little or no syntactic changes to sup-port threads, and operating systems and architectures have evolved to efficiently support them.Many technologists are pushing for increased use of multithreading in software in order to take advantage of the predicted increases in parallelism in computer architectures. In this paper, I argue that this is not a good idea.


    A schoolman's guide to Marshall McLuhan


    An introduction to Data Oriented Design with Rust - Statistically Insignificant

    An introduction to Data Oriented Design with Rust An introduction to Data Oriented Design with Rust In the post we will investigate the main …


    De Morgan's Laws

    De Morgan’s laws are a pair of boolean algebra rules, if written in javascript-style boolean expressions, they look like this:


    How JavaScript works: inside the V8 engine + 5 tips on how to write optimized code

    Couple of weeks ago we started a series aimed at digging deeper into JavaScript and how it actually works: we thought that by knowing the…


    Index 1,600,000,000 Keys with Automata and Rust - Andrew Gallant's Blog

    I blog mostly about my own programming projects.


    Introduction - Rust Design Patterns

    A catalogue of Rust design patterns, anti-patterns and idioms


    On Weaponised Design ~ Shiba Computer

    The lived experiences of digital platform users is at odds with how these systems are designed. Weaponised design – a process that allows for harm of users within the defined bounds of a designed system – is faciliated by designers who are oblivious to the politics of digital infrastructure or consider their design practice output to be apolitical. Despite traumatic events against users with increasing regularity, addressing the weaponisation of design is not yet a priority, and is still to be addressed by the design community.